Coming Soon

Silence and Cry

(Csend és kiáltás)
A film by Miklós Jancsó

Hungary, 1965

 

 

An elliptical, claustrophobic drama shot in the brilliant, breathtaking long takes that are Jancsó’s trademark, Silence and Cry is set after the fall of the short-lived Hungarian Soviet Republic of 1919. A young Red soldier, fleeing the anti-Communist manhunt, takes refuge at the isolated farm of a peasant family, who are are already under police scrutiny for being politically suspect...

 

Working on a more intimate canvas, following the epic The Round-Up and The Red and the White, Hungarian master Jancsó's film is still very much concerned with the terrible, tyrannical impact of power, politics and history.


The Girl from Hunan Still


 

"A newly intimate, domestic level [for the director]...Jancsó’s characteristic sequence shots turn the chamber drama into a political thriller pregnant with wider connotations"

Tony Rayns, Time Out

 


ON BLU-RAY AND DVD 2017

 


 

Diary for my Children

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Witchhammer (Kladivo na čarodějnice)
A film by Otakar Vávra
Czechoslovakia, 1969

 

 

Otakar Vávra's Witchhammer, co-written by Ester Krumbachová (Daisies, Fruit of Paradise) chronicles the series of notorious 17th Century Czech witch trials, undertaken using the infamous ‘Malleus Maleficarum’ (the ‘Witchhammer’ of the title), the Catholic treatise on witchcraft which endorsed the extermination of witches and developed a detailed legal and theological theory for this purpose. Using genuine court transcripts from the forced confessions of those accused of sorcery and collusion with the Devil, it is a powerful and often shocking allegory of life under totalitarian rule.

 

With echoes of Bergman and František Vláčil, and with literary antecedents in Arthur’s Miller’s The Crucible and Aldous Huxley’s The Devils of Loudon, it is a disturbing political fable; and like Ken Russell's controversial, expressionistic adaptation of Huxley’s text, The Devils (1971) and other films of the period such as Michael Reeves' Witchfinder General (1968) and Michael Armstrong's Mark of the Devil (1970), it serves as both grim genre film and compelling historical drama.


The Girl from Hunan Still


 

"Made with relentless precision, rhythm and logic… beautifully staged in CinemaScope with stylish photography by Josef Illík and a compelling score by Jiří Srnka" Peter Hames

 

" A humanist horror film and an indisputable work of art" Senses of Cinema

 


ON BLU-RAY AND DVD 2017

 


 

Diary for my Children

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 






Home Browse The Collection Coming Soon About Second Run Shop Contact Us/Mailing List